Wednesday, July 27, 2011

Genocide in Karachi & Lesson from Harsh Mander (India)


Delivering a live telephonic address from London on the foundation day of Muttahida Qaumi Movement at Lal Qila Ground, Azizabad, on Tuesday, Altaf Hussain gave a message of brotherhood, love and affection, saying that the spirit of tolerance needs to be inculcated among each member of both the MQM and PPP. Presenting a peace formula, Altaf Hussain said that all the religious and political parties of the country should send five-member delegations to Karachi for the sake of restoring peace, adding: “If a single bullet is fired anywhere in the city, these delegations should be sent to the concerned area to see by themselves as to who is spoiling the peace of Karachi”. He particularly invited Jamat-e-Islami, Tehrik-e-Insaf, Pir Saheb Pagara of PML-F, Sheikh Rasheed of Awami Muslim League and PML(N) to come to Karachi for taking out a rally for peace and unity. He also invited Asfandyar Wali to come to Karachi for the sake of peace as Karachi happens to be the economic hub of the country and it belongs to each and every person living in this city. REFERENCE: Altaf warns PPP not to push MQM to the wall Fasahat Mohiuddin Wednesday, July 27, 2011 http://www.thenews.com.pk/TodaysPrintDetail.aspx?ID=59659&Cat=4&dt=7/27/2011 

Wednesday, July 27, 2011, Shaban-ul-Muazzam 24, 1432 A.H
http://jang.com.pk/jang/jul2011-daily/27-07-2011/main.htm



















Wednesday, July 27, 2011, Shaban-ul-Muazzam 24, 1432 A.H
http://jang.com.pk/jang/jul2011-daily/27-07-2011/col3.htm






















Statistics compiled by the HRCP Karachi chapter shows that a total of 1138 people have been killed in the city during the first half of 2011, with 490 of them falling prey to targeted killings on different grounds including political, sectarian and ethnic basis. “Karachi has been under the influence of political parties for the past several months and continuous surge in killings in the city reflects the government’s inefficiency to cope with the mounting threat of insecurity,” said Zohra Yusuf, Chairperson HRCP while sharing statistics during the press briefing at their office. For appeasing the ruling coalition partners, she noted, the government had failed to take any decisive action against culprits causing unrest in the city. Of the 490 victims of target killings, 150 were killed apparently for their association with various political, religious and or nationalist parties, 56 for their ethnic background and eight on sectarian grounds. According to the HRCP report, as many as 65 women were killed during first six months of this year – 24 of them were killed by relatives, 26 by unidentified culprits, four were set on fire, three killed on railway tracks, 2 each killed by robbers and Lyari gangsters, three on the pretext of Karo-Kari, while one woman was killed by police. Meanwhile 37 men lost their lives in the ongoing Lyari gang war this year. The report listed 56 ethnic killings which were reported this year. Of those targeted, 51 of the victims were male, while one female and four children were killed. The figure shows that 250 people with no political affiliation were also killed in Karachi this year while 139 killings were reported during the corresponding period of last year. This indicated a rise of 179% in the killings this year. The report detailed names of parties (political, religious, nationalist and banned organizations) or groups and the number of their activists assassinated during the first six months of 2011. It said 77 target killing victims belonged to Muttahida Qaumi Movement; 26 to Pakistan People`s Party; 29 to Awami National Party; 16 to Mohajir Qaumi Movement-Haqiqi; 7 to Sunni Tehreek; 9 to Jamaat-e-Ahl-e-Sunnat; two to Jamiat-e-Ulema Islam; one to Pakistan Muslim League-Nawaz (PML-N); one to Jamaat-i-Islami (JI); one each to PML-Functional, Jeay Sindh Qaumi Mahaz, and Punjabi-Pakhtun Ittehad and four to Sipah-e-Sahaba (banned). During the first six months of 2010, the figures were comparatively low as MQM-H had their 34 activists killed; MQM 22; PPP 11; PPP-S 2; Punjabi Front 1; ANP 16; Sunni Tehreek 4; PML-N 1; PML-Quaid-i-Azam 1; PML-F 1; JI 3; Jamiat Ulema-i-Islam 2; JSQM 2; PPI 1; Sipah-i-Sahaba (banned) 3; and Tehreek-i-Taliban (banned) 1. REFERENCE: HRCP report indicates rise in killings this year By PPI Published: July 6, 2011 http://tribune.com.pk/story/203309/hrcp-report-indicates-rise-in-killings-this-year/ 


Shame - Cry, The Beloved Country Reflections on the Gujarat massacre by a serving IAS officer. - 'Obedience Pushes You To Fascism' The IAS officer who put in his papers in protest after seeing the unprecedented state and administrative complicity in the Gujarat carnage. Interviews Harsh Mander Magazine | Apr 15, 2002 - Upendra Baxi has reviewed the recently published book titled “Fear and Forgiveness: The Aftermath of Massacre” by Harsh Mander in April 3, 2010 issue of Economic and Political Weekly (EPW). He describes the publication of this book itself as a “solemn event in terms of our commitment to and solidarity with the Gujarat 2002 violated and the survivors’ quest for human rights and justice.” The book highlights the tension created by the competitive plebiscitary democracy and its adverse impact on the position of the human rights and human rights violation of the vulnerable communities. Harsh Mander has tried to resurrect the memory of the Mahatma by a unique moral invention of Nyayagraha. “This invention owes much to the understanding of the four pillars of any future-oriented quest for authentic process of reconciliation. These are: acknowledgment; remorse; repara­tion; and justice. Nyayagraha con­stitutes a remarkable call for the pursuit of ‘legal justice’ conceived not so much as ‘retribution’ but rather as an important articulation of equal citizenship rights” Baxi notes that the book contains references to a series of independent reports on Gujarat riots in 2002 that “gathered system­atic evidence of the enormity of brutality, long advance preparations for the car­nage, the deliberate subversion of relief, rehabilitation, and the legal process, and the comprehensive denial of the [human] rights of the persons internally displaced by violence”. He further notices that Mander instead of indulging Gujarat bashing also brings messages of hope and reconstruction by by highlighting the fact that how, many families risked their life to provide shelter to the hapless Muslims under attack. REFERENCES: Harsh Mander on Gujarat 2002 April 21, 2010 http://www.theminorityview.com/2010/04/harsh-mander-on-gujarat-2002.html
'Obedience Pushes You To Fascism' The IAS officer who put in his papers in protest after seeing the unprecedented state and administrative complicity in the Gujarat carnage. Interviews Harsh Mander Magazine | Apr 15, 2002 http://www.outlookindia.com/article.aspx?215186  Shame Cry, The Beloved Country Reflections on the Gujarat massacre by a serving IAS officer. Harsh Mander Web | Mar 19, 2002 http://www.outlookindia.com/article.aspx?214944  'We Have No Orders To Save You' State Participation and Complicity in Communal Violence in Gujarat April 30, 2002 http://www.hrw.org/en/reports/2002/04/30/we-have-no-orders-save-you  Modi destroys massacre records By Jawed Naqvi | From the Newspaper (17 hours ago) Today http://www.dawn.com/2011/07/01/modi-destroys-massacre-records.html

Cross Fire with Meher Bukhari 7th July 2011 Karachi Killings


http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=w55mlHOeIsM


KARACHI: The wave of ‘ethnic violence’ that largely affected Orangi Town on Tuesday spread to other parts of the city on Wednesday, when the most gruesome incident of the day took place early in the morning in Gulshan-i-Iqbal where five men were found shot dead in a minibus. The minibus, of route D7, was found parked in Block 1 of Gulshan-i-Iqbal containing the five bodies, which the police shifted in a single ambulance to the Jinnah Postgraduate Medical Centre. The bodies were later identified as those of minibus driver Wali Mehsud, Ghulam Jan, Ahmed Jan and Niaz Jan. A spokesman for the Awami National Party said that the latter three were relatives. They hailed from Bajaur Agency and lived in Landhi. The fifth victim was later identified as Liaquat Baloch, a resident of Gulberg. His body was found stuffed in a gunny bag, police said.

They said the four men were shot in the head by unidentified assailants, while Liaquat Baloch had strangulation marks. Quoting the conductor of the minibus, who had jumped off the minibus and fled to safety, SSP Niaz Ahmed Khosa told Dawn that the minibus had started its journey at Sohrab Goth for Landhi. When it reached near the Fazal Flour Mill on Rashid Minhas Road, suspects riding two motorcycles stopped and boarded the bus and held the passengers at gunpoint. The ill-fated minibus was caught on CCTV cameras at three spots when it was travelling in Gulshan-i-Iqbal. The footage showed two motorcyclists tailing the minibus, a senior police officer told Dawn. In Gulshan Block 1, two men stopped a van of the Gulshan-i-Iqbal police station and informed the police that they had heard shots being fired inside the minibus as it passed by. Subsequently, the police van drove in the direction and soon found the minibus dripping with blood. The spot where the minibus was abandoned was also covered in the CCTV footage obtained by the police in which three suspects could be seen coming out of the minibus and running to the two motorcycles, the police said. “The minibus stopped at the spot at 5.57am and within a few seconds the three suspects disembarked it and escaped. Two minutes later the police van reached the scene,” said SSP Khosa. However, the body found stuffed in the gunny bag remained a mystery. Police collected seven spent bullet casings of 9mm and .30-bore pistols in the minibus.

The family of the murdered driver said Wali Mehsud, 26, had married about six months back. In other incidents of violence, the body of a young man bearing a gunshot wound was found within the remit of the Mauripur police station. The police said the victim was later identified as Nasir Khan, an ANP activist. The victim was a resident of Rasheedabad. Police said that later when the body was taken to his home in Rasheedabad, people in Baldia resorted to indiscriminate firing in the area that resulted in the death of Salman Shaikh, a factory worker who was going for lunch. The incident occurred within the jurisdiction of the Site-B police station. His body was taken to the Civil Hospital Karachi for medico-legal formalities.

In the Muslimabad area of Orangi Town, Sharafat was killed and two others were wounded when gunmen opened fire on them. A spokesman for the ANP claimed that Sharafat was a party worker. His body was taken to the Qatar Hospital in Orangi Town. Meanwhile, two persons wounded in Orangi Town on Tuesday died in the Abbasi Shaheed Hospital on Wednesday, hospital sources said. They were identified as Jahan Bibi, who was brought from Qasba 2½, and Rameez. In the early hours of Wednesday, Naresh Kumar, 23, was killed by unidentified assailants riding motorcycles within the remit of the Napier police station. The victim was a resident of Murad Memon Goth and had come to Lyari to attend a family gathering, the police said. Similarly, also in the early hours of Wednesday, another young man, Sha’aban, was shot dead in Khadda Market. The victim was a resident of Nayabad. On Wednesday, two men were targeted in a different incident in Gulshan-i-Iqbal and North Nazimabad, police said.

In the first incident, Haji Abdussalman, 25, was targeted by gunmen riding a motorcycle near the Dhaka Sweets shop in Gulshan-i-Iqbal. The victim was rushed to a private hospital, where he was pronounced dead on arrival. The police said a pistol was found in the possession of the dead. In North Nazimabad, a man was killed within the remit of the Shahrah-i-Noor Jahan police station. The North Nazimabad SP said Asghar Khan, 40, was on the rooftop of his house when he was hit by a bullet. Police said he did not have any political affiliation. However, a spokesman for the ANP said that Asghar Khan, son of Umar Khattab, was the vice president of its Ward UC-2. Orangi Town SP Khurram Waris said that 12 suspects were arrested in different parts of the town and weapons were seized from them. As many as 10 people were killed and dozens others were wounded in violence on Tuesday. As firing continued and tension prevailed on a second day of violence, residents of Qasba Colony, Kati Pahari and other parts of Orangi Town remained confined to their homes and ran short of basic commodities of daily use. REFERENCE: CCTV cameras capture gunmen behind minibus massacre By S. Raza Hassan | From the Newspaper July 7, 2011 (3 weeks ago) http://www.dawn.com/2011/07/07/cctv-cameras-capture-gunmen-behind-minibus-massacre.html 


With the world becoming increasingly connected, political correctness in ideas and behaviour is becoming essential for minimising frictions, and for that reason it also is becoming the hallmark of the educated. We Pakistanis often complain about the lack of “randomness” at airport security checks abroad and go livid at any generalisation linking Pakistanis to terrorism, but then sadly, this indignation is reserved for foreign lands only, the same is definitely not displayed within Pakistan. Pick up any mobile phone here, and it is bound to have SMSed jokes with the racist stereotyping of Pathans. While such stereotyping for the sake of humour is at times tolerable, one is simply astonished to find the same to be believed for real. During the recent spate of violence in Karachi, I was shocked to come across a very high proportion of educated Urdu speaking Karachiites who believe the Pashtun ethnicity to be nothing short of a deformity, and the Pashtun influx as a curse for Karachi. One of the main fears expressed, is that since Pashtuns are more likely to be associated with terrorism and theft, stopping their inflow would naturally result in a more peaceful Karachi. Besides being horrifyingly similar to the “all Pakistanis are terrorists” argument often used by anti-immigration groups in the West, this one stoops even lower as it seeks to quarantine fellow Pakistanis on the basis of ethnicity. This argument conveniently ignores the fact that if the profession of gate keeping and driving in Pakistan can be associated with one ethnicity, then it is the Pashtuns. While I am no fan of generalisations, but if one is to be done, then considering the typical Pashtun professions shouldn’t the generalisation be one of trust, rather than distrust?

Pashtuns are also held responsible for bringing the drugs and Kalashnikov culture into Karachi. This argument completely ignores the well-documented planning and financing of the so called “Afghan jihad”, furthermore, people who say such things basically consider Karachi as an entity separate from Pakistan. The arms and drugs trade was crucial in financing the jihad, and the inflow of drugs and guns was not something new just for Karachi, it was the same for Peshawar, FATA as well as the rest of Pakistan. Pashtuns as an ethnicity are facing the brunt of that blunder committed by our “strategists” in the 80s. But, to completely ignore that whole episode and blame it on the DNA of an ethnicity would be too ignorant a conclusion. It goes without saying that the response to an increase in violence and drugs is better policing and not racial discrimination. There also is a ridiculous belief that Pashtuns are somehow incapable of “culturally assimilating” into Karachi, reasons usually given are the inability to speak Urdu and having more conservative norms. To begin with almost all Pakistani Pashtuns are bilingual; it is very rare to find someone in Peshawar who can’t speak Urdu let alone find a Pathan in Karachi who wouldn’t. Furthermore, the norms of the Pashtuns might be considered conservative, but that is if compared with those of the Brazilians. Karachi is no Rio de Janeiro, as testified by the fluttering black burqas on Sea View and Gidani, and also as the former stronghold of Jamaat-e-Islami, Karachi can never be too liberal for even the most conservative of Pakistanis. Those who consider the Westernised bubbles of Clifton and Defense as the real Karachi are sadly mistaken.

These generalisations mask a worry, which emanates from rising Pashtun numbers in Karachi. Frustrated by wars and lack of economic opportunity, these Pashtuns are heading towards Karachi for a better life. But then, Karachi is not unique in receiving such migrants, just across the border, Mumbai is going through the same. Interestingly, the Urdu/Hindi speaking migrants from Uttar Pradesh, form the bulk of migrations into Mumbai. Those who are worried about this influx into Karachi, should consider the fact that Karachi used to have a Sindhi majority, a fact that changed after the Mohajir influx. If there was nothing illegitimate about that phenomenon, then assuming no bigotry, there should be no apprehensions about Karachi becoming a Pashtun majority city, because in essence the only difference between an Urdu speaking Mohajir and a Pashtu Speaking Mohajir is that of the date on their train tickets. Sadly, the expression of this apprehension is not limited to verbal racism, statistics on the ethnicity of the victims show that they are overwhelmingly Pashtun. Mehr Bokhari’s show on the 7th of July, 2011, revealed that in the violence till that point, 80 Pashtuns and 7 Mohajirs were killed. The irony of the situation is that those who are bent upon declaring the Pashtun as a separate species, also make a case for victimhood based on post-partition hostilities doled out to Pakistan’s Mohajir community. It should be obvious that the pre-requisite for claiming a higher moral ground based on those injustices, is not to rationalise the same (if not worse) that is being doled out to Karachi’s new Mohajirs. The writer is an Islamabad-based development economist. He blogs at iopyne.wordpress.com REFERENCE: Karachi’s Pashtun “Problem” By:Imran Khan http://www.pakistantoday.com.pk/2011/07/karachi%E2%80%99s-pashtun-%E2%80%9Cproblem%E2%80%9D/ 



KARACHI, March 23: While parts of the city have been in the grip of ethnic violence once again for the past many days, it is observed that the victims of targeted attacks as well as patients belonging to certain communities were usually not taken to the nearest government hospital. The alarming trend where people with a certain ethnic background avoid some hospitals even if they are in a precarious condition has developed over the years, though it becomes noticeable during spates of ethnic killings and violence that the city often witnesses. “Yes, there is a clear pattern that Pakhtun victims of targeted attacks are not taken to the Abbasi Shaheed Hospital for treatment; they even don`t allow the bodies of targeted killing victims to be taken to the ASH,” said a senior official of the medico-legal section of the Sindh government on the condition of anonymity. The official cited the recent killing of ANP general secretary of district west Advocate Mohammad Hanif Khan, saying that the victim was attacked in SITE`s Metroville area but was taken all the way to the Jinnah Postgraduate Medical Centre, where he was pronounced dead.

A senior doctor of the JPMC also confirmed the pattern, saying that the JPMC received patients, including those with gunshot wounds, from as far as central and west districts of the city. “There have been several instances where the body of a targeted killing victim was shifted to the Abbasi Shaheed Hospital mortuary but the heirs took away the body to another hospital,” charity workers said.

`Ambulance workers know`

Senior official of the Edhi Foundation Anwer Kazmi also confirmed to that the trend had been in evidence for the past many years. He said people belonging to a certain community avoided going to some hospitals. “Now even ambulance drivers have learnt as to which hospital the body of a victim from a certain ethnic background should be shifted,” Mr Kazmi said, adding that in case a friend or relative of the victim was present at the time of shifting the driver acted on their advice. “Generally people belonging to the Pakhtun community go to the Jinnah Postgraduate Medical Centre for treatment, while those belonging to the Urdu-speaking community by choice visit the Abbasi Shaheed Hospital,” he said. Former President of the Pakistan Medical Association Dr Habibur Rehman Soomro confirmed the trend, saying that certain ethnic communities avoided visiting some hospitals. “Everyone is witness to this alarming trend but no one is ready to point it out,” he said, citing the air of mistrust prevailing in the metropolis. He said the practice was followed not only by the Pakhtun community, but also by people from other ethnic backgrounds. He explained that if there was a conflict going on between the Urdu-speaking and Sindhi-speaking people, the Sindhi-speaking people would avoid visiting certain hospitals. The former PMA president said that the trend had been there for the past 10 to 15 years. He went on to say that certain private-sector hospitals were also following such a trend and were offering community-based services.

`Just an impression`

However, Sindh Health Minister Dr Saghir Ahmed dispelled the impression that Pakhtuns avoided going to the Abbasi Shaheed Hospital for treatment. “A visit to the hospital would show you that the Pakhtuns are under treatment at the Abbasi Shaheed Hospital,” he said. He added that if statistics from the police surgeon office were examined, they would also dispel this impression. “There may be an impression, but it`s not true in reality,” he insisted. REFERENCE: Ethnic divide hits city hospitals By S. Raza Hassan | From the Newspaper March 24, 2011 http://www.dawn.com/2011/03/24/ethnic-divide-hits-city-hospitals.html 

Violence in Karachi - 1 (News Night with Talat Hussain 8th July 2011)


http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=7ftGoVYH_sA


TORN apart by ethnic and political strife, Karachi has long been a tinderbox that can be set ablaze by the smallest of sparks. There is no shortage of antagonists in this city and the latest round of allegations can trigger a deadly chain reaction. It has often been said that Karachi is more cosmopolitan than any other major city in Pakistan. A patchwork and quite resplendent quilt, if you will, that had been carefully and harmoniously crafted over time but began falling apart at the seams in the mid-`80s. Since then we have seen peaceful pauses that are almost inevitably destroyed by the most horrible violence imaginable. Mohajir versus Sindhi nationalists, the security operation against the MQM, a short-lived spell of `activism` by the Punjabi Pakhtun Ittehad and then the out-and-out conflict between the MQM and the ANP that has rocked the city in recent years. Now yet another inflammatory ingredient has been tossed into the pot. The Muttahida Qaumi Movement, which has parted ways with the Pakistan People`s Party, is clearly at loggerheads with the administration. Neither side has done itself any favours. Zulfiqar Mirza of the PPP seems bent on provocation. He almost boasted the other day that he met MQM-Haqiqi leader Afaq Ahmed, Muttahida`s primary foe, in jail. Is it becoming of a minister to have contact with a man who is, rightly or wrongly, accused of heinous crimes including murder? The government must act with greater restraint than its opponents. The MQM, for its part, has thrown down the gauntlet, challenging the government to take its pick: political negotiation or street combat. As messages go this one is quite clear, for it seems that both sides have taken polar positions that can only hurt the city further. The MQM`s statements come close to a threat of extreme violence. At the same time, the MQM ought to be asked whether a person like Aamir Khan, a former dissident who was until recently accused by the MQM of similar atrocities, should have been present at the press conference in which the Muttahida`s Anis Kaimkhani lambasted the PPP. Karachi has seen enough warfare and cannot afford another showdown. Too much blood has been spilled already, families devastated and livelihoods lost due to industrial shutdowns and a general fear factor that is crippling productivity. The numbers game cannot be played out in Sindh. The political situation here is far too complex than in other parts of the country and cannot be resolved without a joint effort. We need to learn how to live with ourselves. REFERENCE: Playing with fire From the Newspaper (11 hours ago) http://www.dawn.com/2011/07/12/playing-with-fire.html

Violence in Karachi - 2 (News Night with Talat Hussain 8th July 2011)


http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=zyuORXocbRA

KARACHI: Sindh Senior Minister Dr Zulfikar Mirza’s diatribe and the immediate and violent reaction by MQM sympathisers left 15 innocent people dead in the city. At a juncture when the city struggled to return to normality after the bloodshed that left over 100 people dead and many more wounded, Dr Mirza’s remarks were inciting and provocative. And he found an active audience for his show, thanks to the TV channels that had nothing better to offer at 10:55pm that night. At the same time, coverage of Dr Mirza’s speech and the street protests also demonstrated how the vernacular media was sharply divided, consciously or otherwise, along ethnic lines. While the Urdu press remained focused on the outburst against Altaf Hussain and the ethnic slurs against the Urdu-speaking population of the province, the Sindhi press “expressed the sentiments of the natives” and denounced the demand for a new province. Worse still were the sound bytes by the “common man” or MQM supporters that showed a no holds barred barrage of insults that further added to the violence.

“The press reports keeping in mind its audience. While the English press is more restrained and usually tries to find a balanced approach, the Urdu and regional papers and television channels have a more awami flavour. They will highlight what they feel will get their audience to respond,” says journalist Razzak Abro. Giving the example of the furore caused by Shahbaz Sharif’s comments regarding Karachi being turned into a province, he said that this wasn’t taken too kindly by the Sindhis. “Obviously, to Sindhis the idea of separating Karachi and turning it into a new province touches a raw nerve. Already emotions are running high and at this point, hate speech or any inflammatory comment will be taken in a different light by the audience,” he elaborated. “In the bid for outshining each other when it comes to ‘breaking news’, the channels at times try to get SOT (sound on tape) that will elicit a reaction. The way things went haywire after Dr Mirza’s speech is a case in point. First off, his speech should not have been aired and then the particular section where he went in an overdrive against the Urdu-speaking community could have well been avoided. It’s the responsibility of the press to have self censorship,” said an anchor at a Sindhi TV channel.

While the night was a mess, the following morning saw the papers devoting columns to Dr Mirza’s rant. The story in Kawish, a leading Sindh daily, quoted him as saying: “Those who dream of breaking down Sindh must remember that this can only happen over our dead bodies.” In a similar vein, Awami Awaz quoted Dr Mirza: “A new province in Sindh only over our dead bodies”. “The reports in most leading English dailies did not take into account these lines uttered by him and even if they did, the readership base which happens to be the educated and in a better socio-economic status overlooked at this particular “over my dead body” comment as a rhetorical rant. But for the lower middle class and those with nationalist leanings, these lines mean a whole lot more,” says Azhar Khan, a regular watcher of Sindhi TV channels. “Yes the channels do tend to sensationlise and newspapers may misquote, but the fact is that as a leader, Dr Mirza or for that matter anyone else should be careful about what they say. His apology today won’t bring back the 15 people killed since that night,” he opined. “Its like seeds of discord are being planted. We have seen this sort of thing in the 90s when the Urdu press went into an overdrive against the Sindhi and Pakhtun population and the ethnic violence has gradually worsened over the years. The Bushra Zaidi case is an example. That’s when this wave of ethnic violence started. From that point on, the press also took side. Most notorious was a leading Urdu paper that printed small news items in its inside pages, which were faked news report about the mohajir community being harassed in Sindh. Again, this was retorted by the Sindhi press. Although their circulation was limited to the Sindhi-speaking masses, the paper carried items about the ‘outsiders’. This has polarised the environment and it’s not just limited to ethnicity. Same goes for sectarian violence too,” Mr Khan said.

As the war of words escalated Dr Mirza and other politicians, citizens responded differently. While the distaste towards his remarks was visible, also noticeable was the reaction to the ‘new province’. “For us, a divided Sindh is not acceptable at all,” said Bilal, a 20-year-old student of political science at the University of Karachi. He said that while Dr Mirza had hurt the sentiments of the Urdu-speaking people, the Sindhi-speaking people had been repeatedly hurt by the “demand of a new province within Sindh”. “We have welcomed the Pakhtuns and the Mohajirs into our city but now they want to control what is ours,” he said. In a column ‘Nadan Dost, Dana Dushman’ that appeared on July 16, 2011 in Daily Kawish, Agha Rafique broke down the politics of the city. At the end of the write-up he summed up the reaction to Dr Mirza’s speech by writing about the ‘celebratory’ text messages he received that praised Dr Mirza for taking a bold stance. In Awami Awaz, a column by Rana Nathan Shah dismissed the moves of the MQM and at the same time downplayed the Mirza episode by saying that MQM created a ruckus over Dr Mirza’s meeting with Afaq Ahmed. “It was more than the meeting that led to the bloodshed in the city,” commented a reader. “Freedom of speech is everyone’s right. But the press should report sensibly rather than highlighting these statements. People need to realise that the country is immune to Karachi’s ethnic fights and when something like ‘over my dead body’ is getting their attention, it’s not very right. It was his personal opinion that is now affecting everyone. We have seen marriages and peaceful coexistence between the Pakhtuns, Mohajirs and Sindhis as well as other ethnicities. But yes if you keep drumming down something, eventually it will affect people, especially the impressionable youth,” said journalist Lubna Jerar Naqvi. At a time when understanding and active listening is needed along with massive amounts of restraint, these rants of personal biases are just adding to the volatile mix that furthers the political and ethnic divide in the city and the province. REFERENCE: The ‘overlooked’ details By Sumaira Jajja | From the Newspaper July 18, 2011 (2 weeks ago) http://www.dawn.com/2011/07/18/the-overlooked-details.html 

Violence in Karachi - 3 (News Night with Talat Hussain 8th July 2011)


http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=vDrP7LQsOrM
During May 2007 leading Pakistani Journalists received "Death Threats" from a group which is shamelessly given "Special Coverage" by the Private TV Channels and Print Media during the recent riots (July 2011) in Karachi. What a joke, on one hand these Media Barons talk of Threats whereas the same Media give Special Coverage to the Rogue Elements who hurl threats to the Free Media?

"QUOTE"

In reaction to the statement, the Mohajir Rabita Council demanded that Dr Zulfikar Mirza and Awami National Party leader Shahi Syed leave Karachi within 48 hours otherwise strong protests against them would continue. However, the MRC suspended the protests when MQM chief Altaf Hussain appealed to the people to end all peaceful demonstrations, said MRC General Secretary Arshad Siddiqui on Thursday evening. REFERENCE: 15 killed, 32 vehicles torched during MQM protest By S. Raza Hassan | From the Newspaper July 15, 2011 (2 weeks ago) http://www.dawn.com/2011/07/15/15-killed-32-vehicles-torched-during-mqm-protest.html 

 ISLAMABAD: Twelve journalists have been declared "enemies" by an organisation linked to a party that supports President Musharraf, a media rights group said. The New York-based Committee to Protect Journalists said in a statement on Saturday that the Karachi-based Muhajir Rabita Council has "listed 12 journalists by name and identified them as 'enemies.'" The CJP did not say why the designations were made, but they seem to be linked with coverage of violence in Karachi on May 12 in which some 41 people were killed and dozens wounded, many from gunfire. Minister of State for Information Senator Tariq Azeem Khan said he was unaware of any such list. The CPJ said the council is closely associated with Muttahida Qaumi Movement, an ethnic-based party that is centred in Karachi and strongly backs Musharraf. A Muttahida lawmaker denied the group was involved in threatening journalists. "Threatening anyone is not our policy," said Haider Rizvi, an MQM MNA. Members of the Muhajir Rabita Council could not be reached for comment. The media rights group said that after the Muhajir Rabita Council publicised its list of "enemies," Syed Huma Ali, president of the Pakistan Federal Union of Journalists, received anonymous threatening phone calls. "Threats against journalists are mounting in Pakistan and the government must take immediate steps not only to protect journalists, but also to actively seek out and bring to justice those that would harm them," Bob Dietz, CPJ's Asia programme coordinator, said in the group's statement. Tariq Azeem Khan said Pakistan has "unprecedented freedom for press and journalists." "So far we have no news of anyone (being) singled out for maltreatment or any threat," he added. REFERENCE: CPJ condemns list of ‘enemy’ journalists Monday, May 28, 2007 http://thenews.com.pk/TodaysPrintDetail.aspx?ID=8152&Cat=13&dt=5/30/2007


Muhajir Rabita Council dismisses apology

 Updated at: 1311 PST,  Thursday, July 14, 2011
Muhajir Rabita Council dismisses apology KARACHI: The Muhajir Rabita Council has dismissed the apology made by Interior Minister Rehman Malik Thursday, Geo News reported.  According to general secretary of the council Arshad Siddiqui, MQM workers are demanding that Zulfiqar Mirza should personally apologize to MQM Chief Altaf Hussian.  According to the council, President Asif Ali Zardari should immediately remove Zulfiqar Mirza from his post and if this is not done then the president will be responsible for the situation in the city.

http://www.geo.tv/7-14-2011/83693.htm 
















KARACHI: The APNS has welcomed the resignation of Federal Minister for Housing Syed Safwanullah of the Muttahida Qaumi Movement, who resigned on Monday in compliance with his party’s directives. The APNS has repeatedly contacted the Muttahida Qaumi Movement on this issue following the May 22 hit list of anti-Muhajir “journalists” issued by the Muhajir Rabita Council. The APNS had urged the Muttahida Qaumi Movement to remove Safwanullah from his Ministry in the federal government as he was the President of the Muhajir Rabita Council at the time of issuance of the journalists’ hit list. The APNS believes that the Muttahida Qaumi Movement has acted effectively: firstly, in disassociating itself from the Muhajir Rabita Council statement, and secondly, after effecting Safwanullah’s resignation from the Muhajir Rabita Council, it has withdrawn him from the federal cabinet as a consequence of the hit list issued by the Muhajir Rabita Council during his tenure as its president. The only outstanding item from the agenda of the actions urged by the APNS is for the Muttahida Qaumi Movement leadership to persuade the Muhajir Rabita Council to withdraw the 13-members hit list of journalists that the Muhajir Rabita Council had earlier issued. REFERENCE: APNS welcomes Safwanullah’s resignation Wednesday, July 11, 2007 http://www.thenews.com.pk/TodaysPrintDetail.aspx?ID=8962&Cat=13&dt=7/13/2007 


KARACHI: The Muhajir Rabita Council has dismissed the apology made by Interior Minister Rehman Malik Thursday, Geo News reported. According to general secretary of the council Arshad Siddiqui, MQM workers are demanding that Zulfiqar Mirza should personally apologize to MQM Chief Altaf Hussian. According to the council, President Asif Ali Zardari should immediately remove Zulfiqar Mirza from his post and if this is not done then the president will be responsible for the situation in the city. REFERENCE: Muhajir Rabita Council dismisses apology Updated 2 days ago http://www.thenews.com.pk/NewsDetail.aspx?ID=18701&title=Muhajir-Rabita-Council-dismisses-apology 

Muhajir Rabita Council (MRC) Exposes Nawaz Sharif & Supports General Pervez Musharraf. (Express News 2009)

video
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=pWjuxVMGp9c


KARACHI: The Muhajir Rabita Council (MRC) has demanded that Senior Provincial Minister Zulfiqar Mirza and ANP Sindh President Shahi Sayed leave Karachi within 48 hours otherwise strong protests would continue, Geo News reported. The General Secretary of MRC Arshad Siddqui in a statement said Zulfiqar Mirza had insulted the founders of Pakistan adding that he should come on the media and apologize to MQM Chief Altaf Hussain. Arshad Siddiqui said that the apology from Rehman Malik is not acceptable and MQM workers want Zulfiqar Mirza to apologize to the MQM chief. He said that President Asif Ali Zardari should take immediate action and remove Zulfiqar Mirza from his post and if the President did not remove Mirza than he would be responsible for the ensuing situation. REFERENCE: MRC issues ultimatum to Mirza, Sayed Updated 2 days ago http://www.thenews.com.pk/NewsDetail.aspx?ID=18704&title=MRC-issues-ultimatum-to-Mirza,-Sayed  UK paper blames MQM for May 12 carnage Rauf Klasra Sunday, June 03, 2007 http://www.thenews.com.pk/TodaysPrintDetail.aspx?ID=8280&Cat=13&dt=6/1/2007  


KARACHI, May 25: The International Federation of Journalists (IFJ) has expressed resentment over a press release issued on May 22 by the Mohajir Rabita Council (MRC) that “included a list of journalists described as chauvinistic, among other insults”. A statement issued by IFJ said: “It is alleged that the list included Zaffar Abbas (resident editor, Dawn, Islamabad), Mazhar Abbas (AFP bureau chief in Karachi), Azhar Abbas (DawnNews TV channel), Ayaz Amir (Dawn), Sajid Mir (anchor of TV One), Shaheen Sehbai (head of ARY One World), Dr Shahid Masood (anchor of GEO TV), Aneeq Ahmed (anchor of ARY One World), Afsar Imam (Aaj TV), Zarar Khan (Bureau chief, AP, Karachi), Zahid Hussain (chief reporter, GEO) and Irfan Siddiqui (columnist, Nawa-i-Waqt).” The statement condemned the MRC press release and called it “very disappointing”. “The last thing Pakistani journalists need is future generations of enemies being developed,” IFJ president Christopher Warren is quoted in the statement as saying. “Threats such as these lead to self-censorship among journalists, which of course is the goal of the intimidators, but which is also a condition that governments who are committed to press freedom cannot allow to develop,” Mr Warren said. “Journalists need to know that they will be protected from threats or attack, and the Pakistani government needs to step up and provide that protection,” he said. REFERENCE: IFJ enraged by MRC’s threat to journalists May 26, 2007 Saturday Jamadi-ul-Awwal 09, 1428 http://archives.dawn.com/dawnftp/72.249.57.55/dawnftp/2007/05/26/nat6.htm 



KARACHI, May 24: The Pakistan Federal Union of Journalists (PFUJ), in an appeal to all media groups, has called for immediate safety and security measures for journalists, including comprehensive life insurance, in view of increasing incidents of violence and threats against them. In a statement issued here on Thursday, the PFUJ expressed concern over what it termed record rise in incidents of violence against journalists and other media personnel in 2007. Terming unacceptable a recent press release issued by the Muhajir Rabita Council, which had named some journalists and columnists as chauvinists, the PFUJ urged the Muttahida Qaumi Movement (MQM) to use its influence on organisations like the MRC to withdraw the statement, as it would not only create a feeling of insecurity among media personnel but would also harm the democratic culture and freedom of expression in the country. REFERENCE: PFUJ demands adequate security May 25, 2007 Friday Jamadi-ul-Awwal 08, 1428 http://archives.dawn.com/dawnftp/72.249.57.55/dawnftp/2007/05/25/nat17.htm 


KARACHI, May 25: The All Pakistan Newspapers Society (APNS) has urged the president and prime minister to take notice of recent statements of Mohajir Rabita Council (MRC) and MQM Rabita Committee against journalists and said that such deliberations may generate hatred against the press. In a statement signed by APNS secretary-general Mohammad Aslam Kazi, it was said that the society was concerned over the statements of the MRC and the Rabita Committee “denouncing journalists and analysts in the print and electronic media as being anti-Mohajir and biased chauvinists”. In the statement of the MRC, which was issued by four high ranking office-bearers, 13 leading journalists from the print and electronic media were named in a publicly announced hit list as ‘Mohajir dushman’ (enemies of Mohajirs), the APNS statement said, adding that the president of the MRC, Syed Safwanullah, a Muttahida Qaumi Movement minister in the federal government, upon contact had expressed his ignorance about the statement and promised a contradiction, which remained unrealised so far. According to the APNS, another statement issued in the names of two members of the MQM Rabita Committee, Mohammad Ashfaque and Javed Kazmi, had used almost the same expressions as the MRC and hurled similar charges. The APNS believed that the statements of both the MRC and the Rabita Committee against journalists “are likely to provoke hatred against the press in general and incite supporters of the two parties to the possible commission of an offence against those journalists named in the statements,” it said. It urged the MQM committee to formally denounce the inclusion of a hit list in the Rabita Council’s statement and to persuade them to withdraw the inflammatory declaration and also re-examine the statements issued by two of its members, and withdraw it as well in the interest of better relations between political parties and the press. REFERENCE: APNS assails statements of MRC against journalists May 26, 2007 Saturday Jamadi-ul-Awwal 09, 1428 http://archives.dawn.com/dawnftp/72.249.57.55/dawnftp/2007/05/26/nat5.htm 


Karachi --- The Mohajir Rabita Council has condemned death threats to some Karachi-based journalists, and described it as yet another conspiracy to malign Mohajirs. It demanded a high level inquiry into the matter and punishment to the culprits. In a statement faxed to Dawn by its press secretary Minhajul Arfeen, MRC's Senior Vice-President Yaqoob Bandhani, General Secretary Tasadduq Hussain, Finance Secretary Ms Raeesa Mohani and members of the working committee claimed that they had come to know from the print and electronic media that some unidentified people had dropped envelopes containing bullets and threatening letters in the vehicles of three journalists. It may be pointed out that cars of the two reporters and photographer were parked outside the Karachi Press Club when the envelops were discovered. Each envelope contained only one bullet and no threatening letter. The media also reported accordingly. Demanding a high level inquiry into what it described as a deplorable threat to journalists, the MRC press release maintained that the organisation comprised elders who had played a pivotal role in the creation of Pakistan and had always, through peaceful means, struggled for the rights of Mohajirs. It maintained that after the May 12 mayhem in the city, conspirators had expedited their drive against Mohajirs, and claimed that the envelopes with bullet and threatening letters were part of that conspiracy. REFERENCE: Mohajir community denies allegations that they threatened journalists Dawn Thursday, May 31, 2007 Asia Media PAKISTAN: Threats to journalists termed 'conspiracy against Mohajirs' http://www.international.ucla.edu/asia/news/article.asp?parentid=71119



Karachi --- The International Federation of Journalists (IFJ) has expressed resentment over a press release issued on May 22 by the Mohajir Rabita Council (MRC) that "included a list of journalists described as chauvinistic, among other insults".

A statement issued by IFJ said: "It is alleged that the list included Zaffar Abbas (resident editor, Dawn, Islamabad), Mazhar Abbas (AFP bureau chief in Karachi), Azhar Abbas (DawnNews TV channel), Ayaz Amir (Dawn), Sajid Mir (anchor of TV One), Shaheen Sehbai (head of ARY One World), Dr Shahid Masood (anchor of GEO TV), Aneeq Ahmed (anchor of ARY One World), Afsar Imam (Aaj TV), Zarar Khan (Bureau chief, AP, Karachi), Zahid Hussain (chief reporter, GEO) and Irfan Siddiqui (columnist, Nawa-i-Waqt)."

The statement condemned the MRC press release and called it "very disappointing". "The last thing Pakistani journalists need is future generations of enemies being developed," IFJ president Christopher Warren is quoted in the statement as saying. "Threats such as these lead to self-censorship among journalists, which of course is the goal of the intimidators, but which is also a condition that governments who are committed to press freedom cannot allow to develop," Mr Warren said. "Journalists need to know that they will be protected from threats or attack, and the Pakistani government needs to step up and provide that protection," he said.

APNS assails statements of MRC against journalists

Karachi --- The All Pakistan Newspapers Society (APNS) has urged the president and prime minister to take notice of recent statements of Mohajir Rabita Council (MRC) and MQM Rabita Committee against journalists and said that such deliberations may generate hatred against the press. In a statement signed by APNS secretary-general Mohammad Aslam Kazi, it was said that the society was concerned over the statements of the MRC and the Rabita Committee “denouncing journalists and analysts in the print and electronic media as being anti-Mohajir and biased chauvinists”. In the statement of the MRC, which was issued by four high ranking office-bearers, 13 leading journalists from the print and electronic media were named in a publicly announced hit list as ‘Mohajir dushman' (enemies of Mohajirs), the APNS statement said, adding that the president of the MRC, Syed Safwanullah, a Muttahida Qaumi Movement minister in the federal government, upon contact had expressed his ignorance about the statement and promised a contradiction, which remained unrealised so far. According to the APNS, another statement issued in the names of two members of the MQM Rabita Committee, Mohammad Ashfaque and Javed Kazmi, had used almost the same expressions as the MRC and hurled similar charges. The APNS believed that the statements of both the MRC and the Rabita Committee against journalists “are likely to provoke hatred against the press in general and incite supporters of the two parties to the possible commission of an offence against those journalists named in the statements,” it said. It urged the MQM committee to formally denounce the inclusion of a hit list in the Rabita Council's statement and to persuade them to withdraw the inflammatory declaration and also re-examine the statements issued by two of its members, and withdraw it as well in the interest of better relations between political parties and the press. REFERENCE: Asia Media Date Posted: 5/25/2007 Council releases a list of journalists deemed subversive to society Dawn Friday, May 25, 2007 PAKISTAN: IFJ enraged by MRC's threat to journalists http://www.international.ucla.edu/article.asp?parentid=70724 


KARACHI, May 29: In what appears to be a direct death threat, bullets were found on Tuesday night in the cars of three senior journalists parked outside the Karachi Press Club. The cars belonged to secretary-general of Pakistan Federal Union of Journalists Mazhar Abbas, Zarar Khan and photojournalist Asif Hussain. When the journalists opened their vehicles, each of them found a bullet wrapped in a brown paper envelope. It may be pointed out that names of Mazhar Abbas and Zarar Khan had appeared in a statement of the Mohajir Rabita Council in which they were described as anti-Mohajir chauvanists. The journalists immediately informed Sindh Governor Dr Ishratul Ibad Khan and IG Police Azhar A. Farooqi. An FIR was lodged with the police. The Karachi Union of Journalists has strongly condemned death threats to the journalists and demanded that the culprits be brought to justice. It also demanded that the organisations whose names have appeared in this connection must publicly denounce and disassociate itself from such terrorist activities. REFERENCE Journalists get death threats By Our Staff Reporter May 30, 2007 Wednesday Jamadi-ul-Awwal 13, 1428 http://archives.dawn.com/dawnftp/72.249.57.55/dawnftp/2007/05/30/nat4.htm 



LAHORE, May 30: The Punjab Union of Journalists on Wednesday staged a demonstration in front of the Lahore Press Club to condemn death threats to three senior Karachi journalists. A large number of city journalists carrying placards and banners urged the government to protect journalists. They also raised slogans against the MQM and the government. The journalists given death threats included Pakistan Federal Union of Journalists Secretary General Mazhar Abbas, Zarar Khan and Asif Hussain. Speaking on the occasion, PUJ President Arif Hameed Bhatti and General Secretary Amer Raza urged the government to take stern action against the MQM, and ban it. It should also expose those disturbing peace in Karachi, they said. They also urged the Punjab government to ban the entry of the members of the party into Punjab.

They said the union would give a call for a hunger strike if the government failed to protect journalists who would continue to perform their duty without caring for the consequences. Meanwhile, in a statement the South Asia Media Commission (SAMC) expressed its anger over threats to the life and property of journalists in Karachi and Peshawar given by, what it said, different extremist organizations. It urged the Pakistani authorities to protect the journalists. The statement issued by SAMC Regional Coordinator Husain Naqi here said the life threats to the three Karachi journalists came a week after a shadowy organization, The Mohajir Rabita Council with links to the MQM, a party that supports military ruler President Pervez Musharraf, issued a list of a dozen journalists, declaring them as enemies, it said.

It said on May 25 gunmen attacked the Peshawar home of Daily Times cartoonist Muhammad Zahoor at around 2am. Four-time winner of the All Pakistan Newspaper Society’s annual best cartoonist award, Zahoor had drawn many cartoons on the Supreme Court chief justice’s dismissal in recent weeks. The home of Nasrullah Afridi, the Urdu language daily Mashriq in the Khyber Agency section of the Tribal Areas, came under grenade attack after death threats made against him five days earlier by the head of Lashkar-i-Islam. “We believe it is a very serious threat to working journalists. It is an attempt to muzzle the free media. The government should arrest those behind the threats,” SAMC Chairperson N Ram and General Secretary Najam Sethi said. They said journalists needed to know that they would be protected from threats or attack. “If the government fails to do so, we will be justified in believing that there is complicity of the government in the current campaign to harass journalists,” they said. They said the Muhajir Rabita Council had issued a threatening statement on May 22 with a list of some 20 journalists it described as chauvinist and hostile to their movement. REFERENCE: PUJ rally condemns threats to journalists By our Staff Reporter May 31, 2007 Thursday Jamadi-ul-Awwal 14, 1428 http://archives.dawn.com/dawnftp/72.249.57.55/dawnftp/2007/05/31/nat45.htm 

HYDERABAD, May 30: Journalists staged protest demonstrations and held rallies in different parts of Sindh on Wednesday against the issuance of life threats to PFUJ secretary-general Mazhar Abbas, AP correspondent Zarar Khan and photographer Asif Hussain, and attack on Shakeel Turrabi, Editor-in-Chief, Sana News. Members of the press club and Hyderabad Union of Journalists demonstrated against the harassment of journalists by ‘terrorists.’ President Hyderabad Press Club Shahid Shaikh said this was only a symbolic protest demonstration but if such threats were not stopped media people will resort to direct action. NAWABSHAH: Journalists of Nawabshah staged demonstration outside the press club. They carried placards and raised slogans in favour of press freedom. Speaking on the occasion, Mohammad Anwar Shaikh said that the government was claiming that press and media were free but threats were being issued to journalists. The members condemned such threats. JACOBABAD: Journalists of Jacobabad took out a rally led by Nazar Abbas Shah, president district union of journalists, while activists of political parties and social organisations also participated in it. Protesters staged a sit-in near the DCO Chowk. REFERENCE: Threats to journalists condemned May 30, 2007 Wednesday Jamadi-ul-Awwal 13, 1428 http://archives.dawn.com/dawnftp/72.249.57.55/dawnftp/2007/05/31/nat31.htm 


KARACHI, May 29: In what appears to be a direct death threat, bullets were found on Tuesday night in the cars of three senior journalists parked outside the Karachi Press Club. The cars belonged to secretary-general of Pakistan Federal Union of Journalists Mazhar Abbas, Zarar Khan and photojournalist Asif Hussain. When the journalists opened their vehicles, each of them found a bullet wrapped in a brown paper envelope. It may be pointed out that names of Mazhar Abbas and Zarar Khan had appeared in a statement of the Mohajir Rabita Council in which they were described as anti-Mohajir chauvanists. The journalists immediately informed Sindh Governor Dr Ishratul Ibad Khan and IG Police Azhar A. Farooqi. An FIR was lodged with the police. The Karachi Union of Journalists has strongly condemned death threats to the journalists and demanded that the culprits be brought to justice. It also demanded that the organisations whose names have appeared in this connection must publicly denounce and disassociate itself from such terrorist activities. REFERENCE: Dawn Report Journalists get death threats By Our Staff Reporter May 30, 2007 Wednesday Jamadi-ul-Awwal 13, 1428 http://archives.dawn.com/dawnftp/72.249.57.55/dawnftp/2007/05/30/nat4.htm

No comments: