Saturday, January 24, 2009

Comedy of Shia Sunni Differences - 17

Syed wrote:

Your understand is wrong. tau agar shia Imam Jaffar ko follow karte hain tau yeh un ki ghalti hai kyunke Allah ne Quran main Irshad farmaya hai ke "Muhammad (PBUH) ki zindagi tumhare liye example hai", it means our ideal should be Muhammad (PBUH).Issi tarah jo apne aap ko Shafi, Barelvi etc.. kehte hain woh bhi Allah ke naa farman hain...


Muhammad Furqan wrote:

It seems that you know nothing and i suggest Mr. Syed not to argue with the person like you. Well if you read the Holy Books you will find the creiteria of Kafir, Munafiq, murdid etc.

(1) Did quran declare Qaidiani Kafir?

(2) What about buddist, Hindus etc?

(3) Can you proof yourself and your forefathers a muslim (mention verses of quran....)

(4) Can you tell me the what is the criteria of being a Muslim?

(5) If you don't believe in Mullas Fatwa then you should not believe in "Nikkah nama" (marriage agreement) of your parents as it is issued and approved by Mullas hence not a Hujjat (proof) tell me where it is written that you are the legal son of your parents.

Dear Mr Furqan,

If I know nothing then why did you ask question from me. However, as per my poor and humble knowledge, answers are as under:

(1) Did quran declare Qaidiani Kafir? [Furqan]

Mirza Ghulam Ahmed denied the finality of Prophet Mohammad [PBUH] and declared it openly and this is ultimately denying the Quran so Mirza automatically became Infidel because denying the finality of Prophet Mohammad [PBUH] is negating Quran. Read the Quran.

(2) What about buddist, Hindus etc?

Their act of associating Partner with Allah is enough proof. Read Quran.

(3) Can you proof yourself and your forefathers a muslim (mention verses of quran....). [Furqan]

My immediate forefathers were Muslim and so am I [By the Grace of Allah]. And if they were not then I am not responsible for them. Read Quran Chapter 2 Verse 141 .

(4) Can you tell me the what is the criteria of being a Muslim? [Furqan]

Having belief on the Five Pillars of Islam as given in Quran and Hadith [Bukhari, Muslim and other Hadith books]

(5) If you don't believe in Mullas Fatwa then you should not believe in "Nikkah nama" (marriage agreement) of your parents as it is issued and approved by Mullas hence not a Hujjat (proof) tell me where it is written that you are the legal son of your parents.[Furqan]

Nikah can be managed/recited by anybody by reciting Masnoon [As prescribed in Hadith] Khutbah {Read Khutbah of Nikah in Sahih Muslim, Nisa'ai, Musnad Ahmed, Sunan Darimi, Mishkqat - Only three or two Verse from Quran]. Sir, you must learn something about Masnoon Nikah and Islamic Marriage before opening your filthy mouth because its not Mullah who approved the marriage but the Quranic Verses, Alimony [Meher] and Witnesses and Mullah is only a Record Keeper. You shouldn't worry about my being illegitimate [Harami] or legitimate [Halali] because you would not be the Judge on the Judgement day. Lets assume I am a Bastard then on Judgement Day it wouldn't be Crime before Allah.

Dear Mr Syed,

The Principle of ""Muhammad (PBUH) ki zindagi tumhare liye example hai", it means our ideal should be Muhammad (PBUH)." is not only meant for Shias, Shafa'i and Barelwis but Deobandis as well. Apply the same principle for Rampantly Deviant and Anarchist Mullahs of Deoband.

Mr Furqan should love these Mullahs. A detailed Research on the Deviant Beliefs [Gumrah Kun Aqaid] of Deobandis: Now read the teaching of Fitnah-e-Deobandiya and prove it "CORRECT AS PER YOUR PRISTINE PRINICPLE YOU APPLIED FOR SHIAS ABOVE" through Quran and Hadith.



The Deobandis are one of the groups of Muslims. This group is connected to and named after the University of Deoband _ Dar al-Uloom _ in India. It is an intellectual school of thought that is deeply rooted, and everyone who graduated from that university was influenced by its academic characteristics, so that they became known as Deobandis. The University of Deoband was founded by a group of Indian `ulamaa' (scholars) after the British had put a stop to the Islamic revolution in India in 1857 CE. Its establishment was a strong reaction against western advancement and its materialistic civilization in the Indian Subcontinent, aimed at saving the Muslims from the dangers of these circumstances, especially when Delhi, the capital, had been destroyed following the revolution and the British had taken full control of it. The scholars feared that their religion might be assimilated, so Shaykh Imdaadullaah al-Muhaajir al-Makki and his student Shaykh Muhammad Qaasim al-Nanatuwi, and their companions, drew up a plan to protect Islam and its teachings. They thought that the solution was to establish religious schools and Islamic centers, thus al-Madrasah al-Islamiyyah al-Arabiyyah was established in Deoband as a center for Islam and Sharee'ah in India at the time of British rule.

The most prominent figures of this intellectual school:

1- Muhammad Qaasim Nanootvi

2- Rasheed Ahmad Gangohi

3- Husayn Ahmad Madani

4- Muhammad Anwaar Shah Kashmiri

5- Abu'l-Hasan al-Nadvi

6- Al-Muhaddith Habeeb al-Rahmaan al-A'zami

Thoughts and beliefs

With regard to basic tenets of belief (`aqeedah), they follow the madhhab of Abu Mansoor al-Maatreedi.

They follow the madhhab of Imaam Abu Haneefah with regard to fiqh and minor issues.

They follow the Sufi tareeqahs of the Naqshbandiyyah, Chishtiyyah, Qaadiriyyah and Saharwardiyyah with regard to spiritual development.

The thoughts and principles of the Deobandi school may be summed up as follows:

- Preserving the teachings of Islam and its strength and rituals.

- Spreading Islam and resisting destructive schools of thought and missionary activity.

- Spreading Islamic culture and resisting the invading British culture.

Paying attention to spreading the Arabic language because it is the means of benefiting from the sources of Islamic sharee'ah.

- Combining reason and emotion, and knowledge and spirituality.

Because the Deobandis follow the Maatreedi madhhab with regard to belief (`aqeedah), we have to define what al-Maatreediyyah is:

This is a philosophical (kalaami) group which is named after Abu Mansoor al-Maatreedi. It is based on using rational and philosophical proof and evidence in disputes with opponents from among the Mu'tazilah, Jahamiyyah and others to establish the truths of religion and Islamic `aqeedah (belief). With regard to sources, the Maatreediyyah divide the bases of religion into two categories depending on the source:

1 _ Divine or rational: these are matters which are established independently by reason and the reports follow that. This includes issues of Tawheed and the Divine attributes.

2 _ Legislative matters or transmitted reports, These are matters which reason states may or may not exist, but there is no way to prove rationally that they exist, such as Prophethood, the torment of the grave and issues of the Hereafter. It should be noted that some of them regarded Prophethood as coming under the heading of rational issues.

It is obvious that this is contradictory to the methodology of Ahl al-Sunnah wa'l-Jamaa'ah, because the Qur'aan, Sunnah and consensus of the Sahaabah are the sources of guidance in their view. This is in addition to their bid'ah (innovation) of dividing the sources of religion into rational matters vs. transmitted reports, which was based on the false notion of the philosophers who assumed that the religious texts contradict reason, so they tried to mediate between reason and the transmitted reports. This led them to force reason into fields where it has no place, so they came up with false rulings which contradicted sharee'ah, and that led them to say that they did not know what the texts mean and that only Allaah knows their meaning, or to misinterpret them altogether. In the view of Ahl al-Sunnah wa'l-Jamaa'ah, on the other hand, there is no contradiction between sound reason and the sound transmitted reports.

Attitude of Ahl al-Sunnah towards the Maatreediyyah

It was narrated from the Prophet SAWS (peace and blessings of Allaah be upon him) that this ummah would split into seventy-three sects, all of which would be in the Fire apart from one. The Prophet SAWS (peace and blessings of Allaah be upon him) explained that the saved group is the Jamaa'ah, which is the group that follows the same path as the Messenger SAWS (peace and blessings of Allaah be upon him) and his Companions. Undoubtedly Ahl al-Sunnah wa'l-Jamaa'ah, who adhere to the Qur'aan and Sunnah in terms of both knowledge and actions, are the saved group, and this description applies to them, i.e., they adhere to that which the Messenger SAWS (peace and blessings of Allaah be upon him) and his Companions adhered to in terms of knowledge and actions. It is not sufficient for an individual or group merely to claim to belong to the Sunnah whilst going against the methodology of the salaf, namely the Sahaabah and Taabi'een. Rather it is essential to adhere to their methodology in knowledge, action, approach and spiritual development. The Maatreediyyah are one of the groups whose opinions include true and false views, and some things that go against the Sunnah. It is known that these groups vary with regard to the truth, how near or far they are; the closer they are to the Sunnah, the closer they are to the truth and the right way. Among them are some who went against the Sunnah with regard to basic principles, and some who went against the Sunnah with regard to more subtle issues. There are some who refuted other groups who are farther away from the Sunnah, so they are to be praised with regard to their refutation of falsehood and what they have said of truth, but they have overstepped the mark in so far as they have rejected part of the truth and gone along with some falsehood. So they have refuted a serious bid'ah by means of a lesser bid'ah, and refuted falsehood with a lesser form of falsehood.

This is the case with most of the philosophers (ahl al-kalaam) who claim to belong to Ahl al-Sunnah wa'l-Jamaa'ah…"

There remains one important question to be answered, which is: what is our duty towards the Maatreediyyah and groups who hold similar beliefs such as the Deobandis and others?

The answer varies according to differences in the persons involved.

If someone is stubborn and propagates his bid'ah, then we must warn others about him and explain where he has gone wrong and deviated. But if he does not propagate his bid'ah and it is clear from his words and actions that he is seeking the truth and striving for that purpose, then we should advise him and explain to him what is wrong with this belief, and guide him in a manner that is better; perhaps Allaah will bring him back to the truth. This advice is included in the words of the Prophet SAWS (peace and blessings of Allaah be upon him):

"Religion is sincerity (or sincere advice)." We [the Sahabah] asked, "To whom?" He said, "To Allaah and His Book, and His Messenger, and to the leaders of the Muslims and their common folk." (Narrated by Muslim, 55).

It is important for us to understand, firstly, that the words "Tasawwuf" and "Sufism" are modern terms which refer to something that is not automatically approved of in sharee'ah as the words eemaan (faith), Islam and ihsaan are. Neither is it automatically condemned like the words kufr, fusooq (immorality) and `asyaan (disobedience, sin).

In such cases, we need to find out more about what is meant by such words before we can pass comment. Shaykh al-Islam Ibn Taymiyah (may Allaah have mercy on him) said: "The words al-faqr and al-tasawwuf (i.e., Sufism) may include some things that are loved by Allaah and His Messenger, and these are things that are enjoined even if they are called faqr or tasawwuf, because the Qur'aan and Sunnah indicate that they are mustahabb and that is not altered if they called by other names. That also includes actions of the heart such as repentance and patience. And it may include things that are hated by Allaah and His Messenger, such as some kinds of belief in incarnation and pantheism, or monasticism that has been innovated in Islam, or things that go against sharee'ah and have been innovated, and so on. These things are forbidden no matter what names they are given… And it may include limiting oneself to a certain style of clothing or certain customs, ways of speaking and behaving, in such a way that anyone who goes beyond it is regarded as an outsider, although this is not something that has been stipulated in the Qur'aan or Sunnah; rather it may be something that is permissible or it may be something that is makrooh, and this is a bid'ah that is forbidden. This is not the way of the friends of Allaah (awliya' Allaah); such things are innovations and misguidance that exists among those who claim to follow the Sufi path. Similarly, among those who claim to be servants of knowledge there are innovations that involve beliefs and words that go against the Qur'aan and Sunnah, using phrases and terminology that have no basis in sharee'ah. Many such things happen among those people. The wise believer agrees with all people in that in which they are in accordance with the Qur'aan and Sunnah and obey Allaah and His Messenger, but he does not agree with that in which they go against the Qur'aan and Sunnah and disobey Allaah and His Messenger. He accepts from every group that which was taught by the Messenger… when a person seeks the truth and justice, based on knowledge, he is one of the successful friends of Allaah and His victorious party…

But what Shaykh al-Islam said about the view of Sufis depending on their situation is almost too theoretical for our times, when the objectionable matters that he referred to have become part of the path of those who call themselves Sufis nowadays, in addition to the different occasions they celebrate such as the Mawlid, and their exaggeration about their living shaykhs, and their attachment to shrines and graves, where they pray and circumambulate the graves and make vows to them, and other well-known practices of theirs. Because of these matters, the correct approach now is to warn against them with no reservations. This is what was agreed upon by the Standing Committee in their answer to a question about the ruling on the Sufi tareeqahs that exist nowadays.

They said:

Usually those that are called Sufis nowadays follow bid'ahs (innovations) that constitute shirk, as well as other kinds of bid'ah, such as when some of them say "Madad ya sayyid (Help, O Master)", and call upon the qutubs ("holy men"), and recite dhikr in unison using names by Allaah has not called Himself, like saying "Huw, Huw (He, He)" and "Ah, Ah (a contraction of the word `Allaah')". Whoever reads their books will be aware of many of their innovations that constitute shirk, and other evils.

With regard to the Jamaa'at al-Tableegh, this is one of the groups that is active in the field of da'wah, calling people to Allaah. They do a great deal of good and make commendable efforts. How many sinners have repented at their hands, and how many have now become devoted to worship of Allaah. But this group is not free of some innovations in knowledge and action, to which the scholars have drawn attention. But whatever the case they cannot be described as being one of the misguided groups. We have quoted above the words of Shaykh al-Islam Ibn Taymiyah: The wise believer agrees with all people in that in which they are in accordance with the Qur'aan and Sunnah and obey Allaah and His Messenger, but he does not agree with that in which they go against the Qur'aan and Sunnah
The Jamaa'at Tableegh and the Deobandis

Sufism Today

Sufism or Tasawwuf is divided into many sects, called Tareeqahs. The four major Tareeqahs are, Chistiya, Qadriyah, Naqshbandiya and Soharwardiyah. Sufism in India is represented by ‘the Deobandis’ and ‘the Barelawis’, who follow all these four Tareeqahs. Until the seventeenth century, there was no distinct school of thought amongst India’s Sufi Hanafee Scholars. But mutual disagreements later caused a great rift among them and led to the formation of two different and opposing institutions; the ‘Barelawis’ and the ‘Deobandis.’ Hostilities and bitter disagreements between these two groups have taken dangerous proportions and the Barelawis in particular have exaggerated in the Takfeer (declaring Kufr) of the Deobandis. Both these groups claim to follow the Hanafee Madhhab, though they only follow the Hanafee Fiqh and do not share the beliefs of Imam Abu Haneefah. Since this book focuses primarily on the beliefs and methodology of the School of Deoband and the Jamaat Tableegh, we shall limit ourselves only to those aspects of Sufism that are related to the Deobandis, and study Sufism from their (Deobandi) perspective.

Tareeqah and Sharee’ah: According to the Soofis, Tareeqah is the way by which one reaches to Allah, and Sharee’ah is the path which reaches the Jannah. Tareeqah is special and Sharee’ah is common. Tareeqah is based upon a particular set of beliefs, actions and exercises. [A Dictionary of the Technical Terms used in the Sciences of the Musalmans by Moulvi Muhammad Alee Ibn Alee Al-Thanvi, p.919]

The Barelawis

The founder and Imam of the Barelawis was Ahmad Raza Khan, who was an extremist Sufi known for his Takfeer (declaring Kufr) and extremely heretical beliefs. Allama Ehsan Illahi Zaheer (rahimahullah) has written a detailed book on the Barelawis, which highlights…

The influences of Shi’ism on the founder of the Barelawi school of thought.

The easiness with which they declare Kufr on their opponents.

Their giving superstitions, baseless talk, unfounded stories and fables, the garb of religion.

Their distortion (Tahreef) and misinterpretation of the Book and the Sunnah to support their beliefs.

Anyone who wishes to further study this subject should refer to this book called, ‘Barelawis – History and Beliefs’

Another excellent book that explicitly exposes the corrupted beliefs and actions of the Barelwis is, ‘The Book of Unity or Oneness of Allah’ compiled by Muhammad Iqbaal Kailani.

The Deobandis and the Jamaat Tableegh

The inception of the Deobandi School of thought stems from the differences and disagreements with the Barelawis, and the subsequent formation of the Darul-Uloom Deoband in 1868 by Moulana Qasim Nanotwi. The term, Deobandi, is used to describe all those who were in agreement with the school of Deoband and its ideology. From amongst the Deobandi scholars is Moulana Muhammad Ilyas, the founder of the Tableeghi Jamaat. Moulana Ilyas was much influenced by another prominent Deobandi scholar – Moulana Ashraf Ali Thanvi about whom he used to say, “Hazrat Moulana Ashraf Ali Thanvi has done a great service (to the religion). It is my heart’s desire that the teachings should be his and the Manhaj (methodology) of Dawah (propagation) be mine, so that this way his teachings become well-known.” So, the Jamaat Tableegh shares the same ideology as the School of Deoband and may be considered as the Deobandis’s Dawah organ. Whilst the Deobandis have been constantly bogged down because of the opposition by the Barelawis, the Jamaat Tableegh has been instrumental in the spread of Deobandism by hiding its true orientations and evading controversy. Malfoozat Moulana Ilyaas (Sayings of Moulana Ilyaas), collected by Muhammad Manzoor Noomani, p.50, incident no. 56. Important Personalities amongst the Deobandis and the Jamaat Tableegh 1. Moulana Qasim Nanotwi (d. 1879): “The Darul-Uloom Deoband (the School of Deoband founded in 1868) was founded by Moulana Qasim Nanotwi.” He was ba’yt (taken the oath of allegiance) at the hands of Imdadullah Muhajir Makki.[2] 2. Imdadullah Muhajir Makki (d. 1899): The highly revered Pir (spiritual guide) of the Deobandis. He is the spiritual guide of Moulana Ashraf Ali Thanvi, Moulana Qasim Nanotwi and Moulana Rasheed Ahmad Gangohi. 3. Moulana Ashraf Ali Thanvi (d. 1943): He was ba’yt at the hands of Haji Imdadullah Muhajir Makki and the author of many books like, “Bahishti Zewar” and ‘Tafseer Bayanul Qur’aan’. He named many of his books after his Pir, Imdadullah Muhajir Makki. Like Imdadullah Muhajir Makki, Ashraf Ali Thanvi too was an advocate of Wahdat al-Wajood. Ashraf Ali Thanvi’s teachings greatly influenced the founder of the Jamaat Tableegh, Moulana Ilyas. 4. Rasheed Ahmad Gangohi (d. 1908): Another prominent elder of the Deobandis, who was ba’yt at the hands of Imdadullah Muhajir Makki.[3] One of his famous books is ‘Imdadus Sulook.’ 5. Other Prominent Deobandi Scholars include: Khalil Ahmad Saharanpuri, Aashiq Ilahi Meerathi, Moulana Mahmoodul-Hasan Deobandi, Moulana Shabbir Ahmad Uthmani and Moulana Abdul-Rahim Lajpuri. 6. Moulana Ilyas, popularly known as Hazratjee: (d. 1944): He was the founder and first Amir of the Jamaat Tableegh. He was the Khalifah (successor) of Khalil Ahmad Saharanpuri, who was amongst the Khulafa of Rasheed Ahmad Gungohi.[4] He founded the Jamaat Tableegh on Sufi principles and incorporated many Sufi practices like Muraqabah (meditation), Chillah (40 day seclusion period) and the silent Dhikr (remembrance) into the routines of his Jamaat. 7. Moulana Muhammad Yusuf (d. 1965): Moulana Ilyas was succeeded by his son, Moulana Muhammad Yusuf (d. 1965), who became the second Amir of the Jamaat Tableegh. Inamul-Hasan succeeded Moulana Muhammad Yusuf. Presently, there is no Amir of the Jamaat Tableegh and its affairs are run by a Shoorah (committee). 8. Moulana Zakariyah: The son-in-law of Moulana Ilyas[5] and the author of Fazaail-e-Aamaal. He was well acquainted with Sufism and was given the Khilafah of all the four Sufi Tareeqahs by Moulana Khalil Ahmad Saharanpuri.[6] [1] Mashaikh-e-Chist (Eng. Trans.) p.222. [2] Irshaadul-Mulook (Eng. Trans.) p.32. [3] Irshaadul-Mulook, (Eng. Trans.) p.32. [4] Irshaadul-Mulook, (Eng. Trans.) p.12. [5] Mashaikh-e-Chist (Eng. Trans.) p.307. [6] Mashaikh-e-Chist (Eng. Trans.) p.304-305. The Training Manual of the Jamaat Tableegh Originally known as Tableeghi Nisaab, ‘Fazaail-e-Aamaal’ literally means the virtues (Fazaail) of actions of worship (Aamaal). It consists of a series of booklets written by Moulana Zakariyah Kandhalvi on the instructions of Moulana Ilyas (the founder of Jamaat Tableegh) as mentioned by Moulana Zakariyah himself in his autobiography ‘Aap Beeti.’ Fazaail-e-Aamaal consists of nine booklets, namely - Hikayaat Sahabah, Fazaail-e-Dhikr, Fazaail-e-Namaaz, Fazaail-e-Tableegh, Fazaail-e-Qur’aan, Fazaail-e-Darood, Fazaail-e-Ramadaan, Fazaail-e-Sadaqat and Fazaail-e-Hajj. These series were compiled in two volumes and entitled, ‘Tableeghi Nisaab.’ They were intended to be the fundamental training guide for the cadre of the Jamaat Tableegh. Later on, it was re-named, ‘Fazaail-e-Aamaal.’ This book originally in Urdu, has been translated to many different languages. But it has never been translated into the Arabic language as a whole.[1] [1] The Arabic version is just a small booklet of about 72 pages compared to the original Urdu books, which consists of two volumes (400+ pages each). The Arabs who affiliate themselves to the Jamaat Tableegh never refer to the Tableeghi Nisaab, but to Imaam Nawawi’s collection of Hadeeth, ar-Riyaadh as-Saliheen. . The Deobandis are followers of Sufism Elders of the Deobandi school of thought, from among who is Moulana Zakariyah; the author of Fazaail-e-Aamaal, have testified to the fact that their Manhaj (way) is that of the Sufis and take pride in it. Mufti Abdur-Rahim Lajpuri quoted in his book of Fatawa, the words of Qaree Mohammed Tayyib (the rector of the Darul-Uloom, Deoband) as,
“Religiously, the Ulema of Deoband are Muslims, as a sect they belong to the Ahl us-Sunnah wal-Jamaah, by Madhhab they are Hanafee, in conduct they are Sufis, scholastically they are Maturidi and in Sulook they are Chisti - rather they combine all Sufi orders... And in nisbat they are Deobandi.”
“In essentials and beliefs, they (the Deobandis) follow Imam Abul Hasan Ash’aree and Imam Abu Mansoor Maturidi; and in sub-principles Imam Abu Haneefah. They are initiates of the Chistiyyah, Naqshbandiya, Qadriyah and Soharwardiyah Sufi orders.”
Moulana Mohammad Zakariyah, whose book ‘Fazaail-e-Aamaal’ is revered and used as a training guide by the workers of the ‘Jamaat Tableegh’ highly praises this Fatawa collection (Fatawa Rahimiyyah) of Mufti Lajpuri and approves of the views mentioned In it. A Soofi order i.e. Tareeqah Quoted in Fatawa Rahimiyyah, (Eng. Trans.), vol.1, p.9-10 from Ulama-e-Deoband ka Maslak. Fatawa Rahimiyyah (Eng. Trans.), vol.1, p.58. Moulana Zakariyah says, “The humble writer prays most sincerely for (success of) the Fatawa Rahimiyyah. May Allah make it the lot of the people to avail themselves more and more of and derive benefit from it and make it a Sadaqah-e-Jariah (continuous charity) for you (the author), for the printer and publisher and for everyone who may have in any way endeavored for the publication of this work and bestow upon you (all) its best rewards in both the worlds.” [Quoted from the first page of ‘Fatawa Rahimiyyah’ vol.1, published by the Islamic Book Printers, edition: Feb. 1997] The Definition and Reality of Sufism The Deobandis claim that Sufism is just another name for Tazkeyyatun-Nafs (purification of the soul) and Ihsan (the highest stage of Eemaan). Moulana Muhammad Maseehullah Khan, a Khalifah (successor) of Moulana Ashraf Alee Thanvi states, “It’s (Sufism) function is to purify the heart from the lowly bestial attributes of lust, calamities of the tongue, anger, malice, jealousy, love of this world, love for fame, niggardliness, greed, vanity, deception, etc.”
And, as such, they claim that Sufism does not contradict the Sharee’ah (Islamic Regulation), rather “It is incumbent for every Muslim to become a Sufi. Without Sufism, a Muslim cannot be described as a perfect Muslim” It is also claimed that a Sufi is someone who strictly adheres to the Sunnah and the Sharee’ah. But in reality, Sufism is far from the above description. Purification of the soul and curing the heart from its sicknesses is part of the religion of Islam and is completely explained by Allah’s Messenger (sallallahu alaihi wa-sallam). “Purification of the Soul” as Moulana Muhammad Maseehullah Khan further explains is just the first part of the journey of Sufism, and it is referred as journey towards Allah.
The next part of this journey is called – ‘The journey into Allah’, and “In this high stage of spiritual development, matters pertaining to the Thaat (Being of Allah), Sifaat (Attributes of Allah), Af’aal (Acts of Allah), Haqaaiq (realities) as well as relationships between Allah and His servants become manifest.”
And thus, everything is manifest to the Sufi and nothing is hidden from him. He accomplishes this by either exaggerating in prescribed forms of worship or indulging in innovative forms of worship. This is the real face of Sufism!
Shariat and Tasawwuf p.11. Shariat and Tasawwuf p.11. Some also go to the extent of saying that the Messenger of Allah and his Sahabah were nothing but Soofis. Especially the group of students who resided in the Prophet’s Mosque – the Ashabus-Suffah. Shariat and Tasawwuf p.112. Shariat and Tasawwuf p.113. Sufism is marred by un-Islamic beliefs and is an Ideology in itself Sufism is not just an emphasis on the purification of the soul but a complete ideology in itself and it is marred by un-Islamic concepts and philosophies like:-
1. The belief of Wahdat al-Wajood, which implies that the Creator (Allah) and the creation are one, and the creation is just the manifestation of the Creator.
2. The belief that the Prophets and the Sufi saints are alive in their graves, just as they were alive in this world. They are fully aware of the outside world; they can communicate with the living and help those who call upon them.
3. The spirits (Ruh) of the righteous comes back from the Barzakh.
4. Gross exaggeration in praising the Messenger of Allah (sallallahu alaihi wa-sallam) whilst neglecting his (sallallahu alaihi wa-sallam) teachings in understanding the religion.
5. Total and complete obedience to a Sufi Shaikh.
6. Penance and living the lives of hermits are ways to get closer to Allah.
7. Some Majzoobs, who have reached the goal of Sufism, run the affairs of the creation. Extremist Sufis have even more deviated beliefs, but we limit our discussion to only those beliefs that are related to the Deobandis in this book. S. R. Sharda comments in his book, ‘Sufi Thoughts’, “Sufi literature of the post-Timur period shows a significant change in thought content. It is pantheistic. After the fall of Muslim orthodoxy from power at the center of India for about a century, due to the invasion of Timur, the Sufi became free from the control of the Muslim orthodoxy and consorted with Hindu saints, who influenced them to an amazing extent. The Sufis adopted Monism, Bhakti and Yogic practices from the Vaishnava Vedantic schools. By that time, the Vedantic pantheism among the Sufis had reached its zenith.” This observation by S. R. Sharda is correct, because eastern religions have a well-established and highly revered position for mysticism and abstinence, and Sufi beliefs are amazingly similar to them. Sufi Masters like Ibn Arabee, who is greatly revered by the Deobandi scholars, believed that every religion has element of truth in it. He considered the Pagan religions and idol-worshipers as followers of the truth because in his view, everything is Allah and since there is no difference between the Creator and the created, the worship of the creation is worship of the Creator. His belief as mentioned in al-Fatoohaatul-Makkiyah is: “The slave is the Lord and the Lord is the slave, I wish that I knew which was the one required to carry out the required duties, if I were to say that the servant then that is true, or if I were to say the Lord, then how can that be required for Him.” Ibn Arabee says about the Sufis: “Sufi; the person with complete understanding is he, who sees every object of worship to be a manifestation of Truth (Allah) contained therein, for which it is worshiped. Therefore, they all call it a god, along with its particular name, whether it is a rock, or a tree, or an animal, or a person, or a star, or an Angel.”
It is this lax attitude of the Sufis towards false religions that makes Sufism receptive to many false philosophies and un-Islamic beliefs. Following is a comparison of five concepts and beliefs of Eastern Pagan Religions as compared to Sufi practices.
1 - In Search of God Hinduism and Buddhism claim to possess great books of wisdom inherited from the ancestors but instead of learning from these books, all of their philosophers and thinkers have to take up an essential journey to the wilderness... in search of God. The Sufis too, instead of referring to the Qur’aan and the Sunnah for guidance wander in forests in search of God. They seclude themselves from the society (Khilwah) for specific periods (Chillah), and examples of this are abundant in their books…
1. Moulana Zakariyah says: “He (Imdadullah Muhajir Makki) withdrew himself from the midst of people and wandered in the wilderness of Punjab, which became his home… He would refrain from eating for up to eight days. Not a grain would go down his throat in these periods of self-imposed starvation
2. Moulana Zakariyah says: “A beggar (a Sufi master in disguise) chewed something, and gave Abdul Hadi to eat. As he ate the morsel, his state began to change. Shaikh Abdul Hadi developed a dislike for company and became claustrophobic in settlements. He would wander into the forest and spend most of his time there.”
3. Moulana Zakariyah says: “Shaikh Ahmad Abdul Haqq Radoli was a person of ecstasy, and Uloom-e-Batiniyyah (inner knowledge) attracted him in full force. Even before completing his academic career, he adopted solitude and wandering in the forest.”

2 - The Relationship between the Creator and the Creation The Hindus, Buddhist and Jain religions unanimously agree on the concept that everything is the Creator (i.e. nothing exists other than God. The Creator and His creation are, in reality, one) and ultimately everything merges in Him (the Creator). This merging is basically the goal of worship in Hinduism and Buddhism, which is also known as ‘Moksha.’ These pantheistic views of the Hindus and Sufis are amazingly similar. If one reads books explaining Pantheism by the Hindus and the books of Sufis, one would hardly see any difference. We shall see this with ample proofs in Chapter 3: ‘Pantheism, Wahdat al-Wajood or Moksha.‘

3 - Abstinence is the Key to Piety and Wisdom According to these religions; piety, wisdom and nearness to God is only possible when one devotes all his time in the wilderness and abandons the civilized world. Sadhus or hermits cause great hardships to themselves by practicing harsh acts of abstinence. They live without food for days to end until their bodies are reduced to just bones. Their devotional exercises include hanging upside down on the branches of trees for hours and sleeping on bed of nails. They meditate for long periods sitting without any movement in one position and hold their breaths for enormously long time. Professor D. S. Sarma, the author of numerous Hindu books says: “The higher phase of self-control is detachment. We have not only to overcome what is evil in life but also to become independent of what is good. For instance, our domestic affections, our family ties, our love for home and friends are good in themselves. But, as long as, we are passionately attached to these earthly things, we are only on the lower rungs of the spiritual ladder.”
The Sufis too believe in complete abstinence from worldly pleasures and deprive themselves of the blessings of Allah. It is mentioned in Irshaadul-Mulook, “According to some Sufiya, it has been learnt from experience that thirst is a deceptive desire. Therefore, whoever develops the habit of drinking less water at the time of thirst; Allah will quench his thirst until he gains the ability of abstaining from water for several months at a time. He will not even have the desire to drink water. Despite this, his physical health will not deteriorate in anyway whatsoever. His body will be sustained by the moisture acquired from the food he eats.”
We find number of stories concerning wandering and starvation of their Shaikhs mentioned in their books, 1. “He (Khwaajah Abu Hubairah) loved solitude dearly. His entire life was spent in
one room. He would cry so much that people thought he would die. He abandoned all delicious food.”
2. “Khwaajah Shareef Zandani stayed in forest for 40 years, fleeing from people. He subsisted on the leaves of trees and whatever he could find in the forest. He loved poverty and starvation. He would break fast only after three days. When he ate food, it was only salt-less vegetables.”
3. Khwaajah Uthmaan Haaruni adopted Mujahadah for 70 years, never eating to satiation (to satisfy fully or excess) in all this time. He would drink mouthful of water only after seven days.
4. “Hazrat Faridud Deen’s Shaikh advised him (Faridud Deen) hunger for three days and then eat what comes from Ghayb (Unseen). After three days, nothing came. On account of extreme hunger Faridud Deen put some pebbles in his mouth, the pebbles turned into sugar; he spat them out. A short while later, he again put some pebbles in his mouth which too, became sugar.

This happened again for the third time. When Faridud Deen informed his Shaikh of the incident, his Shaikh said: “It would have been good if you had ate it.”
5. “Khwaajah ilw Mumshad Dinwari was a perpetual faster. It is said that even during his infancy he would sometimes abstain from drinking his mother’s milk. He is therefore called a born wali.”
6. Moulana Zakariyah says: “It is said that Khwaajah Abu Ahmad Abdaal Chisti never slept on bed for 30 years.”

4 - Meditation, Excessive Chanting and breath holding Excessive chanting and breath-holding exercises are essential rituals of mysticism. This is generally done in solitude and for hours together. It is believed that such rituals enlighten the heart with knowledge and gives them miraculous powers.

The Sufis too have similar types of Dhikr… Moulana Zakariyah says: “Hazrat Nizamuddin al-Umri was instructed by his Shaikh to recite ‘Allahu’ 90 times in a single breathe gradually increasing the number in accordance with his ability. Ultimately, he developed his ability to the extent of up to 400 times with a single breath.”
The practice of heavy breathing, as in the Sufi Dhikr of inhaling whilst saying “La-ilaha” and then exhaling to create a loud and sharp voice saying ‘ill-lal-lah’ is seen in various oriental and eastern religions. Islam neither specifies breathing techniques as part of Ibaadah, nor sets any guidelines in this regard. This aspect of Sufism will be discussed further under, ‘Chapter 7: Worship in Islam.’

5 - The Concept of Eternal Life Eastern mystics claim to have eternal life. No people would worship a mystic or depend upon him to avert evil, if he had no control over his own existence. The concept of death would imply that they could not avert harm or help the people. Thus, the concept of eternal life - as is also inscribed on the grave of Rajneesh, “Osho – Never Born, Never Died - Only visited this Planet, Earth between Dec 11-1931 to Jan 19-1990.”
The Sufis consider their Shaikhs in the graves to be alive and in their senses. They consider them able to benefit their followers. Moulana Zakariyah quotes Haji Imdadullah Muhajir Makki in his book Mashaikh-e-Chist saying, “…The Faqir does not die. He is simply transformed from one abode to another. The same benefit which was received from the Faqir’s physical life will be acquired from his grave.”
These abovementioned examples show the origins of the many deviated and un-Islamic concepts that the Sufis have borrowed from Pagan religions. The Messenger of Allah (sallallahu alaihi wa-sallam) and his Companions (radhi allahu anhu) did not live the life of hermits, neither did they abstain from Halaal blessings of Allah. They did not punish themselves, nor did they indulge in the types of innovative and excessive Dhikr that the Sufis prescribe. They knew that guidance is only in following the revelation and not wandering in the wilderness.

[1] Moulana Zakariyah says: “According to some Ulema, he (Shaikh Ibnul Hamaam Hanafee) was among the Abdal (the Deobandi translator says Abdaal are a class of Awliya whose identities remain concealed. They possess miraculous powers and execute a variety of tasks under Divine Command in various places of the world). [Ikhmaalush Shiyaam (Eng. Trans.) p.59.] Pantheism: The belief that God and the universe are the same - doctrine that God is an expression of the physical forces of nature [The World Book Dictionary] Monism: The doctrine that the Creator and His creation are one and that nothing exists other than Allah. In Soofi terminology, it is known as Wahdat al-Wajood Bhakti: Selfless devotion as a means of reaching a higher spiritual being.
Abu Bakr Muhyiddin Muhammad bin ‘Ali al-Tai, commonly known as Ibn Arabee / Ibn ‘l-’Arabee (1165-1240), was born in Murcia (Spain) and died in Damascus. He was one of the leading authorities on Sufism, who is respected by Sufis around the world. The scholars of the school of Deoband consider Ibn Arabee to be one of ‘the great Soofi saints’ and refer to him, Ash-Shaikh al-Akbar (The Greatest Shaikh). A Question was put to Mufti Abdur Rahim Lajpuri, ‘Some Moulvis (religious leaders) allege that Moulana Rasheed Ahmad Gangohi, Moulana Muhammad Qasim Nanotwi, Moulana Khalil Ahmad Ambethvi, Moulana Ashraf Ali Thanvi and other religious divines are infidels and apostates, faithless and heretic, accursed and denizens of Hell etc. Please comment. Answer: “The unholy endeavor of vilifying and maligning men... is not something new”. Mufti Lajpuri then gives the examples of Prophets, the Sahabah, the scholars, the pious Imams and the Soofi saints who have suffered likewise. He then states, “(Even) the mystical statements of Ba Yazid of Bastami were adjudged to be inconsistent with the Sharee’ah... About the most great Shaikh Muhiyyud-Din Ibn Arabee it was said, ‘His unbelief (Kufr) is worse than the unbelief of the Jews and the Christians’.” [Fatawa Rahimiyyah (English trans.) vol.1, p.2-4] [7] Al-Fusoos (1/195), al-Wakeel: Hadhihi Hiyas-Soofiyyah (p.38). [8] Mashaikh-e-Chist (Eng. Trans.) p.220 and Imdadul-Mushtaq ila Ashraful-akhlaq (Urdu) p.9. [9] Mashaikh-e-Chist (Eng. Trans.) p.205. [10] Mashaikh-e-Chist (Eng. Trans.) p.166-167. [11] ‘The Religion of the Hindus’ by Professor D. S. Sarma, p.12. [12] Irshaadul-Mulook (Eng. Trans.) p.70. [13] Mashaikh-e-Chist (Eng. Trans.) p.125. [14] Mashaikh-e-Chist (Eng. Trans.) p.140. [15] Mashaikh-e-Chist (Eng. Trans.) p.142. [16] Mashaikh-e-Chist (Eng. Trans.) p.156. [17] Mashaikh-e-Chist (Eng. Trans.) p.126. [18] Mashaikh-e-Chist (Eng. Trans.) p.131. [19] Mashaikh-e-Chist (Eng. Trans.) p.192. [20] Rajneesh has a great admiration for Sufism, and he wrote numerous books on the subject. Among them are, ‘Soofis – the people of the Path’, ‘Just like that’, ‘The Secret’, ‘The Wisdom of the Sands’, ‘The Perfect Master’ and ‘Until you Die.’ [21] Mashaikh-e-Chist (Eng. Trans.) p.211

Historical Background into the Deobandi-Barelawi Differences

Bitter difference and rivalry between the Deobandis and the Barelawis has caused much confusion and hatred amongst Muslims in the Indian subcontinent. One of the major issues that caused the rift and the subsequent formation of the school of Deoband was the Tafseer (explanation) of ‘Khaatam an-Nabeeyeen’ (seal of Prophet-hood) mentioned in Soorah al-Ahzab: “Muhammad (sallallahu alaihi wa-sallam) is not the father of any man among you, but is the Messenger of Allah (sallallahu alaihi wa-sallam) and the last of the Prophets (Khaatam an-Nabeeyeen).”[1] Moulana Ahsan Nanotwi (a prominent Deobandi scholar) mentioned that the Khaatam (seal) of the Prophet-hood mentioned in Soorah al-Ahzab does not deny the advent of another Prophet. And even if another Prophet arrived, this would not affect the finality of Prophet Muhammad’s (sallallahu alaihi wa-sallam) Prophet-hood.[2] The Barelawis strongly objected to this statement and used it as a proof for the Takfeer of the Deobandis. The Deobandis also argue with the Barelawis on futile issues, like (Imkaan al-Kadhib) whether Allah has the ability to lie or not? Other issues of differences were the celebration of Milaad (the Prophet’s Birthday) and various innovations which accompany it, ceremonies in which Soorah al-Fatihah is recited over food before eating, celebrations and festivities held at the graves of popular saints, invoking the Messenger of Allah (sallallahu alaihi wa-sallam) believing that the Messenger is Omnipresent and the like.[3]

The Real Ikhtilaaf (Disagreement)

In reality, the Barelawis and the Deobandis differ more in practice than in principle. This is apparent from books that have been written by the Deobandis in order to bridge their differences with the Barelawis. Most disagreements are either in finer details, or whether those actions are for specific people or for all. A good example is the issue of meditation (Muraqabah) and seeking benefit from the graves. Even though, the two groups outwardly oppose each other on this issue, the only difference is that the Barelawis call towards and recommend visiting graves to derive benefit from them for everyone, whilst the Deobandis make it specific for a few. Therefore, the rift between the Deobandis and the Barelawis is more of mutual prejudice, than of Aqeedah. The Barelawis on their part have relied mostly on conspiracy theories and misinterpretation in their Takfeer (declaring Kufr) of the Deobandis. They created a lot of noise on Moulana Ahsan Nanotwi’s statement, “And even if another Prophet arrived…”, but this statement is not objectionable from the Sufi point of view. It simply stems from the common belief of all the Sufis that everything was created from the light of Muhammad (sallallahu alaihi wa-sallam), and that he (sallallahu alaihi wa-sallam) is the ‘Seal of Prophet hood’ from the very beginning. Besides, ‘real Sufis’ know that since nothing exists other than Allah, to believe in the real existence of Allah’s Messenger (sallallahu alaihi wa-sallam) is Shirk. This shows that the differences between these two Sufi groups are superficial and based mostly upon party rivalry than upon religion. The Sufis in general do not give Aqeedah, which is the core of Islam, its due position. We shall elaborate further in light of statements by Haji Imdadullah Muhajir Makki.

[1] Soorah al-Ahzab (33): 40. [2] Tahzeerun-Naas, p.3 and 25. [3] See Bahishti Zewar, Part 12, p.222, (Unity in Islam by Haji Imdadullah).

The Importance of Aqeedah to the Sufis in light of an essay by Imdadullah Muhajir Makki

Firstly, the influence of the views of Haji Imdadullah Muhajir Makki on the Deobandis and the Jamaat Tableegh cannot be over-emphasized - He is the spiritual guide of many prominent Deobandi scholars like Moulana Ashraf Ali Thanvi, Rasheed Ahmad Gangohi and Qasim Nanotwi. Moulana Rasheed Ahmad Gangohi addresses his Shaikh Imdadullah Muhajir Makki as, “O my Refuge of both worlds.” and Moulana Zakariyah (the author of Fazaail-e-Aamaal) refers to him as, “guide for humanity.” An essay by Imdadullah Muhajir Makki has been compiled in the English translation of ‘Bahishti Zewar by the name, ‘Unity in Islam’ and its subject is the Deobandi-Barelawi Dispute. In this essay, Imdadullah Muhajir Makki comments upon the Milaad gatherings, which are held to commemorate the birth of Allah’s Messenger (sallallahu alaihi wa-sallam). In these gatherings, poetry in praise of Allah’s Messenger (sallallahu alaihi wa-sallam) is read and when the crowd is signaled, everybody stands (to greet the Messenger of Allah (sallallahu alaihi wa-sallam)). Imdadullah Muhajir Makki, the esteemed Shaikh of the Deobandi scholars, says about the Milaad gatherings... “…you should not hate someone who does not perform ‘Qiyaam’ (standing) in Milaad because this is not Wajib (desirable) or Fardh (obligatory)… If you know someone, who considers the Qiyaam as Wajib (obligatory), then Qiyaam will be an innovation for him alone. However, to call all those who perform Qiyaam in Milaad, as innovators, is exceeding the limit. It is quiet possible that the holy Prophet (sallallahu alaihi wa-sallam) stays in his abode in Paradise and our activities are shown to him as on T.V. or somehow through other means; through Angels or without them…” He further adds, “Consider these differences as trivial (unimportant), like the differences between Imam Abu Haneefah and Imam ash-Shafi’ee”. He says: “Do not oppose these ceremonies, where they are customary… If those who oppose Qiyaam are also invited in a general meeting, then it is better to drop the Qiyaam. However, if it is not possible to do so, then if they (those opposed to Qiyaam) wish to continue then they should also join the rest in Qiyaam and Salaam.”[5] Commenting upon music, which is totally Haraam in Islam[6] Muhajir Makki says, “Do not call each other as Bidati (i.e. innovators) and Wahabi, live in peace with moderation. Musical concerts (or Sama or Qawwali) with or without instrumental music are likewise controversial. Some need them (instrumental music) among the loving Sufis (Ahle-Muhabbat) and it is best not to criticize others as hypocrites. Who do not need them should not perform them, but do not divide over trivial (unimportant) differences.” As we mentioned earlier, the Deobandis agree in principle on most issues with the Barelawis. The disagreements are either in finer details or, whether those actions are for specific people or for every one. This essay by Imdadullah Muhajir Makki is an open witness to this attitude and is apparent in both the examples (Milaad and music). Haji Imdadullah Muhajir Makki’s advice to his followers is that Milaad, the gatherings, the standing to greet Allah’s Messenger (sallallahu alaihi wa-sallam) and the belief that even after death Allah’s Messenger (sallallahu alaihi wa-sallam) can attend multiple gathering at the same time are not innovations in themselves. The problem is only with those who consider standing in Milaad to be an obligation! Furthermore, he expresses no real disapproval for this “pagan originated custom” (as today’s Deobandis call it), by allowing his followers to participate in the Milaad. The so-called, ‘Ahle-Muhabbat’ mentioned by Imdadullah Muhajir Makki were those who indulged in the Haraam (prohibited) action of playing and listening to music, in order to please Allah. To exaggerate in righteous actions is bad enough but to indulge in Haraam action claiming to gain the pleasure of Allah is the worst of all. This essay also raises another question as to whether certain actions are Haraam for the common Muslims and Halaal for a special few. Is anyone above the Sharee’ah? Furthermore, Haji Imdadullah Muhajir Makki considers issues of Aqeedah and, Halaal and Haraam to be trivial. He considers such disagreements to be a mercy for the Ummah.

Mashaikh-e-Chist (Eng. Trans.) p.242. Mashaikh-e-Chist (Eng. Trans.) p.218. Bahishti Zewar is a highly revered book of the Deobandis written by Moulana Ashraf Ali Thanvi. This book deals with everyday Fiqh and is traditionally given to brides as part of their dower. The pro-Deobandi Majlis Ulema of South Africa says, “…The reason behind the standing during Milaad is the belief that Rasoolullah presents himself at such gatherings…” By this belief, “The attribute of omnipresence (present in all places at all times) is bestowed upon Rasoolullah.” The same booklet declares, “…the Milaad originated from the pagans.” [All quotations from the booklet, “What is Milaad?” p.12., published by pro-Deobandi Majlis Ulema of South Africa] Bahishti Zewar (Eng. Trans.) Part twelve, p.222. The Messenger of Allah (sallallahu alaihi wa-sallam) said: “I forbid two voices, which are imbecilic and sinfully shameless: one is the voice (of singing)
accompanied by musical instruments and Satan’s wind instruments.” [Related by al-Hakim]. The Prophet (sallallahu alaihi wa-sallam) warned the Muslims against those who consider music to be lawful, when he (sallallahu alaihi wa-sallam) said, “There will be people from my nation [Muslims] who will seek to make lawful: fornication, the wearing of silk [for men], wine drinking and the use of musical instruments [ma’aazif]…. Then Allah will destroy them during the night causing the mountain to fall upon them, while He changes others into apes and swine. They will remain in such a state until the Day of Resurrection.” [Saheeh al-Bukharee, (Eng. Trans.) vol. 7, 494 B] The Sufis consider this Haraam action as food of the soul: Abu Bakr al-Kalabadhi said, ‘I heard Abu’l-Qasim al-Baghdadi say, “Audition is of two kinds. One class of man listens to discourse, and derives therefrom an admonition: such a man only listens discriminately and with his hearten present. The other class listens to music, which is the food of the spirit and when the spirit obtains its food, it attains its proper station, and turns aside from the government of the body; and then there appears in the listener a commotion and a movement.” [The Doctrine of the Sufis, p.164] See Bahishti Zewar, Part twelve, p.223, “Unity in Islam by Hazrat Haji Imdadullah”. Moulana Zakariyah has quoted five page discussion in his book “Mashaikh-e-Chist” from the writing of Moulana Ashraf Alee Thanvi’s by the name, “Haqqus Sama.” The conclusion of this discussion is that listening to Samaa and music is permissible for the Soofis with certain conditions. [See, Mashaikh-e-Chist (Eng. Trans.) p.174.] See Bahishti Zewar, Part twelve, p.222.

Propagation of Truth Mixed with Falsehood

The Deobandis and the Barelawis both have their own specific religious schools, literature and Dawah organizations. It would be unjust to consider both these groups influenced by Sufism on an equal footing, because the Barelawis directly call to acts of Kufr and openly support such views by distorting the meanings of some Qur’aanic verses and Ahaadeeth. The Deobandis, however, do not openly call to grave-worship and saint-worship, and other acts of Shirk and Bidah (innovation). Rather, their Dawah organ, the “Jamaat Tableegh”, calls towards acts of righteousness, like Salaat (prayer), but they have various manifestations of Shirk in their beliefs, and innovations in their actions. Therefore, they may be less deviant but their danger to the Muslims in general is more, because of their hidden nature!! The emergence of people who propagate the good mixed with falsehood, is prophesized by Allah’s Messenger (sallallahu alaihi wa-sallam). Hudhaifah Ibn al-Yamaan (radhi allahu anhu) narrates: “The people used to ask Allah’s Messenger (sallallahu alaihi wa-sallam) about the good and I asked him about the evil, fearing that it would reach me. So I asked: “O Messenger of Allah (sallallahu alaihi wa-sallam)! We were living in ignorance and evil, and then Allah brought this good (i.e. Islam) to us. So, will there be any evil after this good?” He (sallallahu alaihi wa-sallam) replied: “Yes” I then asked: “Will there be any good after that evil?” He replied: “Yes, but it will be tainted” So I asked: “What will be its taint?” He replied: “People who guide others to other than my way, you will approve of some of their deeds and disapprove of others.”


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